Sentence Examples with the word TENOR

For example, we find Plutarch amplifying the suggestion in Plato's latest treatise (the Laws) that this imperfection is due to a bad world-soul that strives against the good, - a suggestion which is alien to the general tenor of Plato's doctrine, and had consequently been unnoticed during the intervening centuries.

The whole tenor of his thoughts instantaneously changed; the battle seemed the memory of a remote event long past.

But having failed, he allowed the paper, and also a second by Chevenix of the same tenor in 1805, to be read without avowing that it was he himself who had originally detected the metal, although he had an excellent opportunity of stating the fact in 1804 when he discussed the substance in the paper which announced the discovery of rhodium.

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The tenor of his speeches was always to encourage Ministers in vigorous action - on such questions, for instance, as the mobilization of industry, the treatment of aliens and the provision of munitions.

As in choruses baritone and low tenor singers always prevail, d - d', at French or at medium pitch, would really be the.

In his soul there suddenly arose such an unexpected turmoil of youthful thoughts and hopes, contrary to the whole tenor of his life, that unable to explain his condition to himself he lay down and fell asleep at once.

The fervour of his political convictions effected a change in the style and tenor of his verse.

But these are contradicted by the tenor of five genuine breves issued in September '774 to the archbishop of Gnesen, and making certain assurances to the ex-Jesuits, on condition of their complete obedience to the injunctions already laid on them.

The latter, judging from the tenor of some of his telegrams, believed that to accomplish this work entailed the suppression of the mahdis revolt, the strength of which he at first greatly underestimated.

The British government seemed, at one time, rather to favour a British participation, but when the terms of the convention were published, the strongest objection was taken to the constitution of the board of directors which established German control in perpetuity, while it was evident from the general tenor of the convention that a political bias informed the whole; in the end public feeling ran so high that any British participation became impossible.