Sentence Examples with the word SMOKE

Prince Bagration, having reached the highest point of our right flank, began riding downhill to where the roll of musketry was heard but where on account of the smoke nothing could be seen.

The flames and smoke of the destroyed villages were clearly seen from the allied fleet.

Some were using their ramrods, others putting powder on the touchpans or taking charges from their pouches, while others were firing, though who they were firing at could not be seen for the smoke which there was no wind to carry away.

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Meanwhile, Stubb retaining his place in the van, still encouraged his men to the onset, all the while puffing the smoke from his mouth.

But behind the veil of smoke the sun was still high, and in front and especially to the left, near Semenovsk, something seemed to be seething in the smoke, and the roar of cannon and musketry did not diminish, but even increased to desperation like a man who, straining himself, shrieks with all his remaining strength.

Not till the smoke was seen from St Thomas's Mount, where Sir Hector Munro commanded some 5200 troops, was an 9;;10vement made; then, however, the British general sought to effect a junction with a smaller body under Colonel Baillie recalled from Guntur.

The smoke proved to be too much for Adrienne and two other girls, so they decided to walk each other home.

When I meet the engine with its train of cars moving off with planetary motion--or, rather, like a comet, for the beholder knows not if with that velocity and with that direction it will ever revisit this system, since its orbit does not look like a returning curve--with its steam cloud like a banner streaming behind in golden and silver wreaths, like many a downy cloud which I have seen, high in the heavens, unfolding its masses to the light--as if this traveling demigod, this cloud-compeller, would ere long take the sunset sky for the livery of his train; when I hear the iron horse make the hills echo with his snort like thunder, shaking the earth with his feet, and breathing fire and smoke from his nostrils (what kind of winged horse or fiery dragon they will put into the new Mythology I don't know), it seems as if the earth had got a race now worthy to inhabit it.

Draught is regulated in the ashpit by opening or closing the bottom door of the furnace and by the damper on the smoke shaft.

I heard once that an Indian can smell cigarette smoke for six miles.