Sentence Examples with the word Fisk

See Life and Writings of Wilbur Fisk (New York, 1842), edited by Joseph Holdich, and the biography by George Prentice (Boston, 1890), in the American Religious Leaders Series; also a sketch in Memoirs of Teachers and Educators (New York, 1861), edited by Henry Barnard.

For the education of negroes the city has Fisk University (opened in 1866, incorporated in 1867), under the auspices of the American Missionary Association and the Western Freedman's Aid Commission of the Congregational Church (noted since 1871 for its Jubilee Singers,who raised money for Jubilee Hall, finished in 1876); it embraces a college department, a preparatory department, a normal department and departments of theology, music and physical training; and Walden University, founded as Central Tennessee College in 1866, under the auspices of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and embracing a college department, a normal department, an industrial department, and departments of English, commerce, law, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, music, bible training, nurse training and domestic science.

In 1908 Berea had 65 instructors and 1150 students; and it paid the tuition of 141 negro students in Fisk University (Nashville, Tennessee) and in other institutions.

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It was during his control of the Erie that he and Fisk entered into a league with the Tweed Ring, they admitted Tweed to the directorate of the Erie, and Tweed in turn arranged favourable legislation for them at Albany.

Upon the removal in 1824 of the conference's academy at New Market, New Hampshire, to Wilbraham, Massachusetts, Fisk became one of its agents and trustees, and in 1826 its principal.

WILBUR FISK (1792-1839), American educationist, was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, on the 31st of August 1792.

Other institutions of higher learning, not under the control of the state, are: the University of Nashville (non-sect., 1785); Washington and Tusculum College (non-sect., 1794), at Greenville; Maryville College (Presbyterian, 1819), at Maryville; Cumberland University (Presbyterian, 1842), at Lebanon; Burritt College (non-sect., 1848), at Spencer; Hiwassee College (non-sect., 1849), at Sweetwater; Bethel College (Presbyterian 1850), at McKenzie; Carson and Newman College (Baptist, 1851), at Jefferson City; Walden University (Methodist, 1866), at Nashville; Fisk University (Congregational, 1866), at Nashville; University of Chattanooga (Methodist, 1867), at Chattanooga; University of the South (Protestant Episcopal, 1868), at Sewanee; King College (Presbyterian, 1869), at Bristol; Christian Brothers College (Roman Catholic, 1871), at Memphis; Knoxville College (United Presbyterian, 1875), at Knoxville; Milligan College (Christian, 1882), at Milligan; South-western Presbyterian College (1885), at Clarkville; and Lincoln Memorial University (non-sect., 1895), at Cumberland Gap.