Sentence Examples with the word Fairy

When the common sense fairy smacks you upside the head, you know where to find me.

He became popularly known as the duende, the fairy or brownie of the palace, and was believed to be the lover of the queen.

In Ireland and the west Highlands neolithic arrow-heads and flint chips are still fairy weapons.

View more

Whirls of dust are caused by the fairy marching army, as by the being called Kutchi in the Dieri tribe of Australia.

Among the Tinneh a miraculous dog, who, like an enchanted fairy prince, could assume the form of a handsome young man, is the chief divine being of the myths.

BERCHTA (English Bertha), a fairy in South German mythology.

She thought she heard ethereal laughter as the fairy danced with him.

Down the edge of each a tiny rill glistens like silver, and this is the ever-plying shuttle that weaves the fairy fabric.

Ewald's son Carl (1856-1908) achieved a great name as a novelist, but did his most characteristic work in a series of books for children, in which he used the fairy tale, in the manner of Hans Andersen, as a vehicle for satire and a theory of morals.

Of the novels produced by other authors between 1870 and 1880, we may mention A hol az ember kezdodik (Where the Man Begins), by Edward Kavassy (1871), in which he severely lashes the idling Magyar nobility; Az en ismeroseim (My Acquaintances), bi Lewis Tolnai (1871); and Anatol, by Stephen Toldy (1872); the versified romances Deli babok hOse (Hero of the Fata Morgana), generally ascribed to Ladislaus Arany, but anonymously published, A szerelem hOse (Hero of Love), by John Vajda (1873), and Talalkozdsok (Rencounters) by the same (1877), and A Tiinderov (The Fairy Zone), by John Bulla (1876), all four interesting as specimens of narrative poetry; Kalozdy Bela (1875), a tale of Hungarian provincial life, by Zoltan Beothy, a pleasing writer who possesses a fund of humour, and appears to follow the best English models; Edith tortenete (History of Edith), by Joseph Prem (1876); Nyomorusag iskoldja (School of Misery), by the prolific author Arnold Vertesi (1878); Tilkolt szerelem (Secret Love), by Cornelius Abranyi (1879), a social-political romance of some merit; and Uj idOk, avult emberek (Modern Times, Men of the Past), by L.