Sentence Examples with the word EQUINOXES

It was considered by Biot to have been originally twenty-four, but to have been enlarged to twenty-eight about i ioo B.C., by the addition of determinants for the solstices and equinoxes of that period.

Gravitation was thus shown to be the sole influence governing the movements of planets and satellites; the figure of the rotating earth was successfully explained by its action on the minuter particles of matter; tides and the precession of the equinoxes proved amenable to reasonings based on the same principle; and it satisfactorily accounted as well for some of the chief lunar and planetary inequalities.

Already, in the third millennium B.C., equinoxes and solstices were determined in China by means of culminating stars.

View more

The precession of the equinoxes is due to the fact that the earth performs a motion of this kind about its centre, and the whole class of such motions has therefore been termed precessional.

The Scandinavian data, from the wealth of observations, are probably the most representative, and even in the most northern district of Scandinavia the smallness of the excess of the frequencies in December and January over those in March and October suggests that some influence tending to create maxima at the equinoxes has largely counterbalanced the influence of sunlight and twilight in reducing the frequency at these seasons.

In Europe the frequency near the equinoxes rises above that at midwinter, and we have a distinct double period, with a principal minimum at midsummer and a secondary minimum at midwinter.

Owing to the precession of the equinoxes it is longer than a tropical or sidereal year by 25 minutes and 2.3 seconds.

Her views on the precession of the equinoxes are not important, but most important are her accounts of what speech meant to her, of how she felt the statues, the dogs, the chickens at the poultry show, and how she stood in the aisle of St. Bartholomew's and felt the organ rumble.

Professor Newcomb, who has compiled an instructive table of the equinoxes severally observed by Hipparchus and Ptolemy, with their errors deduced from Leverrier's solar tables, finds palpable evidence that the discrepancies between the two series were artificially reconciled on the basis of a year 6 m too long, adopted by Ptolemy on trust from his predecessor.

The line of the equinoxes is the imaginary diameter of the celestial sphere which joins them.