Sentence Examples with the word Cor

Leaf-gap; cor cell; per.

Extensive use is made of building materials from the Roman station of Corstopitum (also called Corchester), which lay half a mile west of Corbridge at the junction of the Cor with the Tyne.

The characters of the six classes Cor biloculare, biauritum; Sanguine calido, rubro: Cor uniloculare, uniauritum; 1 Sanguine frigido, rubro: S Cor uniloculare, inauritum; Sanie frigida, albida: are thus given by Linnaeus: - viviparis, Mammalibus; oviparis, Avibus.

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Our knowledge of Lanfranc's polemics is chiefly derived from the tract De cor pore et sanguine Domini which he wrote many years later (after 1079) when Berengar had been finally condemned.

Corum, a double star, of magnitudes 3 and 6; this star was named Cor Caroli, or The Heart of Charles II., by Edmund Halley, on the suggestion of Sir Charles Scarborough (1616-1694), the court physician; a cluster of stars of the firth magnitude and fainter, extremely rich in variables, of the goo stars examined no less than 132 being regularly variable.

The Lay of Orpheus is known to us only through an English imitation; the Lai du cor was composed by Robert Biket, an Anglo-Norman poet of the 12th century (Wulff, Lund, 1888).

Shows that they are in part the summits of a submerged Coast mountain chain, a continuation southward of the Cor dillera Maritima.

The following is Bach's fullest orchestra: the string-band, consisting (as at the present day) of violins in two parts, violas, violoncellos, doubled (where the contrary is not indicated) by double basses; the wind instruments (generally one to each part, as the string-band was never large)-2 flutes, 2 or 3 oboes, or oboe d'amore (a lower-pitched and gentler type), taille or oboe da caccia (some kind of alto oboe corresponding to the cor anglais), bassoon, generally doubling the string basses, 2 horns, with parts needing much greater practice in high notes than is customary to-day, 3 (occasionally 4) trumpets, of which at least the first 2 were played by players especially trained to produce much higher notes than are compatible with the power to produce the lower notes (the high players were called Clarin-Blaser; and the others Principal-Blaser); a pair of kettle-drums, tuned to the tonic and dominant of the piece.

The table on next page shows them in their more cor rect position, in order to display more clearly their relation to the hieratic and demotic equivalents.

The motto that he adopted for use with the arms emblazoned for him as cardinal - Co p ad cor loquitur, and that which he directed to be engraved on his memorial tablet at Edgbaston - Ex umbris et imaginibus in veritatem - together seem to disclose as much as can be disclosed of the secret of a life which, both to contemporaries and to later students, has been one of almost fascinating interest, at once devout and inquiring, affectionate and yet sternly self-restrained.