Sentence Examples with the word Cared

Lucca too enjoyed good government, and the peasantry were well cared for and prosperous.

He retained his old university habit of taking long walks with a congenial companion, even in London, and although he cared but little for what is commonly known as society - the society of crowded rooms and fragments of sentences - he very much liked conversation.

According to the Memoirs of Sir James Melville, both Lord Herries and himself resolved to appeal to the queen in terms of bold and earnest remonstrance against so desperate and scandalous a design; Herries, having been met with assurances of its unreality and professions of astonishment at the suggestion, instantly fled from court; Melville, evading the danger of a merely personal protest without backers to support him, laid before Mary a letter from a loyal Scot long resident in England, which urged upon her consideration and her conscience the danger and disgrace of such a project yet more freely than Herries had ventured to do by word of mouth; but the sole result was that it needed all the queen's courage and resolution to rescue him from the violence of the man for whom, she was reported to have said, she cared not if she lost France, England and her own country, and would go with him to the world's end in a white petticoat before she would leave him.

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He erased the royal lilies from the panels of his carriages; and the Palais Royal, like the White House at Washington, stood open to all and sundry who cared to come and shake hands with the head of the state.

A widespread feeling of indignation spread not only among High Churchmen, but among many who cared little or nothing for the ritual practices involved; and it seemed impossible to foretell what the outcome would be.

The public buildings, which include an interesting watch-tower and belfry, are large, substantial and well cared for.

The more he considered the devastation this would wreak on this woman he cared for, the more apprehension he felt about finding the man.

He cared comparatively little for the history of speculation, but his acquaintance with books of science, general history, travels and belles lettres was boundless.

When we first came out, I remember these notes pinned to us telling the conductor and everyone who cared who we were and where we were going so we didn't get lost.

He cared little for any of the professors, except Sir John Leslie, from whom he learned some mathematics.