meaning of buskin

buskin meaning in General Dictionary

a solid protecting addressing when it comes to base coming some distance within the leg

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  • a boot reaching halfway as much as the knee
  • A strong, protecting addressing when it comes to base, coming some distance within the knee.
  • the same covering for base and knee, made out of very thick soles, to provide an appearance of level to the stature; -- used by tragic stars in ancient Greece and Rome. Pre-owned as symbolic of tragedy, or even the tragic drama, as distinguished from comedy.

buskin meaning in Etymology Dictionary

"half boot," c.1500, origin unknown. The term exists in numerous types in most associated with continental languages, therefore the precise relationship of those all apparently has actually yet become determined. The English word could very well be straight away from Old French broissequin "buskin; a kind of fabric" (14c., contemporary French brodequin by impact of broder "to embroider"), or from Middle Dutch brosekin "tiny fabric boot," that is of uncertain beginning. OED implies a likely prospect in Spanish borcegui, earlier in the day boszegui Figurative sensory faculties in English associated with tragedy come from the term being used (since mid-16c.) to translate Greek kothurnus, the high, thick-soled boot worn in Athenian tragedy; compared with sock, the lower shoe worn by comedians. Related: Buskined.


buskin meaning in General Dictionary

(letter.) A stronger, safeguarding covering the foot, coming some length up the leg.

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  • (letter.) The same covering the foot and leg, made out of extremely dense bottoms, to give an appearance of elevation to your stature; -- worn by tragic actors in old Greece and Rome. Used as a symbol of tragedy, or the tragic crisis, as distinguished from comedy.