meaning of bound

bound meaning in General Dictionary

Ready or intending to continue the way toward going with to and for or with an adverb of movement as a ship is bound to Cadiz or for Cadiz

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  • imp amp p p of Bind
  • Restrained by a hand line chain fetters or the love
  • a leap an elastic springtime a jump
  • which will make to bound or jump on bound a horse
  • The additional or restricting line either real or imaginary of every object or area whatever restrictions or restrains or within which anything is restricted or restrained limitation confine level boundary
  • limited by an oath
  • covered or covered with a bandage
  • limited by agreement
  • headed or intending to mind in a specific path; often utilized as a combining form like in `college-bound students'
  • confined in the bowels
  • held with another element, material or product in chemical or actual union
  • (usually followed by `to') influenced by fate
  • secured with a cover or binding; usually used as a combining type
  • confined by bonds
  • form the boundary of; be contiguous to
  • progress by leaps and bounds
  • springtime back; spring far from an impression
  • location limitations on (extent or amount or accessibility)
  • a range identifying the restrictions of an area
  • the line or jet suggesting the limitation or extent of something
  • a light, self-propelled motion upwards or forwards
  • the maximum feasible amount of some thing
  • of Bind
  • The additional or limiting range, either genuine or fictional, of any item or room; what limits or restrains, or within which one thing is bound or restrained; restriction; confine; degree; boundary.
  • To limit; to end; to repair the furthest point of extension of; -- stated of normal or of ethical objects; to lay along, or kind, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine.
  • to mention the boundaries of; as, to bound France.
  • to go with an abrupt springtime or jump, or with a succession of springs or leaps; whilst the monster bounded from their den; the herd bounded across the plain.
  • To rebound, as an elastic basketball.
  • to help make to bound or jump; because, to bound a horse.
  • To cause to rebound; to toss such that it will rebound;u000du000a as, to bound a basketball on the ground.
  • A leap; an elastic spring; a jump.
  • Rebound; as, the bound of a ball.
  • Spring in one foot to another.
  • imp. & p. p. of Bind.
  • Restrained by a hand, rope, chain, fetters, or the like.
  • Inclosed in a binding or address; since, a bound amount.
  • Under appropriate or ethical discipline or responsibility.
  • Constrained or compelled; destined; particular; -- followed by the infinitive; since, he is bound to ensure success; he could be bound to fail.
  • Resolved; since, i will be bound to get it done.
  • Constipated; costive.
  • Ready or going to go; along the way toward; going; -- with to or even for, or with an adverb of movement; as, a ship will Cadiz, or for Cadiz.

bound meaning in Law Dictionary

an adjective, denotes the health of becoming constrained by the obligations of a bond or a covenant. Into the legislation of delivery, "bound to" or "bound for" denotes that vessel talked of is intended or built to make a voyage into the location named. As a noun, the definition of denotes a limit or boundary, or a line inclosing or marking down a tract of land. In familiar expression "metes and bounds," the former term correctly denotes the calculated distances, as well as the latter the all-natural or artificial scars which suggest their particular start and closing. A distinction is sometimes taken between "bound" and "boundary," toward result that, whilst the previous signifies the limitation it self, (that will be an imaginary line,) the latter designates a visible level which suggests the limit. But no these types of distinction is commonly observed.


bound meaning in Etymology Dictionary

"to form the boundary of," in addition "setting the boundaries of," belated 14c., from bound (n.). Related: Bounded; bounding.

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  • "to jump," 1580s, from French bondir "to rebound, resound, echo," from Old French bondir "to leap, rebound; make a noise, beat (a drum)," 13c., in the end "to echo right back," from Vulgar Latin *bombitire "to buzz, hum" (see bomb (n.)), possibly on type of Old French tentir, from Vulgar Latin *tinnitire.
  • "fastened," mid-14c., in figurative sense of "compelled," from bounden, previous participle of bind (v.). Meaning "under obligation" is from late 15c.; the literal feeling "made quickly by attaching" could be the most recent taped (1550s).
  • "ready to go," c.1200, boun, from Old Norse buinn past participle of bua "to prepare," in addition "to dwell, to reside," from Proto-Germanic *bowan (cognates: Old tall German buan "to dwell," Old Danish both "dwelling, stall"), from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, dwell" (see be). Final -d is apparently through connection with certain (adj.1).
  • "limit," c.1200, from Anglo-Latin bunda, from Old French bonde "limit, boundary, boundary stone" (12c., Modern French borne), variant of bodne, from Medieval Latin bodina, maybe from Gaulish. Now mainly in out of bounds, which initially known limitations enforced on students at schools.

bound meaning in Sports Dictionary

Binding on to another player with one arm. (sport: Rugby Union)


bound meaning in Business Dictionary

1. Condition to be constrained or constricted. As an example, many commercial software programs have terms and conditions that people must agree to be bound to before they could use the program. See in addition bind. 2. Destined for. "The skilled new employee, whom shows numerous guaranteeing characteristics, is surely bound to achieve your goals."


bound meaning in General Dictionary

(imp.) of Bind

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  • (p. p.) of Bind
  • (n.) The exterior or limiting range, either real or imaginary, of any object or area; what limits or restrains, or within which some thing is limited or restrained; restriction; confine; extent; boundary.
  • (v. t.) To limit; to terminate; to correct the furthest point of extension of; -- said of normal or of moral items; to lay along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine.
  • (v. t.) To-name the boundaries of; because, to bound France.
  • (v. i.) to maneuver with an abrupt springtime or jump, or with a succession of springs or leaps; while the creature bounded from their den; the herd bounded throughout the simple.
  • (v. i.) To rebound, as an elastic baseball.
  • (v. t.) Which will make to bound or leap; because, to bound a horse.
  • (v. t.) To cause to rebound; to put such that it will rebound; because, to bound a ball on the ground.
  • (letter.) A leap; an elastic spring; a jump.
  • (letter.) Rebound; because, the certain of a ball.
  • (n.) Spring in one foot to another.
  • imp. & p. p. of Bind.
  • (p. p. & a.) Restrained by a hand, rope, sequence, fetters, and/or love.
  • (p. p. & a.) Inclosed in a binding or cover; because, a bound volume.
  • (p. p. & a.) Under appropriate or ethical restraint or obligation.
  • (p. p. & a.) Constrained or compelled; destined; certain; -- followed by the infinitive; since, he is bound to ensure success; he could be bound to fail.
  • (p. p. & a.) Resolved; as, i will be bound to do it.
  • (p. p. & a.) Constipated; costive.
  • (v.) prepared or planning to go; on your way toward; going; -- with to and for, or with an adverb of motion; since, a ship will Cadiz, or for Cadiz.

Sentence Examples with the word bound

Those countries consisted of a citizenry bound by neither culture nor tradition, and that caused problems.

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