meaning of bind

bind meaning in General Dictionary

That which binds or connections

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  • To link to limit by any ligature
  • To connect or confine with a cord band ligature chain etc to fetter which will make fast on bind grain in bundles to bind a prisoner
  • generate personal or mental ties
  • supply with a binding
  • stay glued to securely
  • wrap around with something in order to cover or enclose
  • secure with or like with ropes
  • make fast; connect or secure, with or as if with a rope
  • bind by an obligation; reason to be indebted
  • fasten or secure with a rope, string, or cable
  • cause to be constipated
  • form a chemical bond with
  • a thing that hinders as though with bonds
  • To tie, or confine with a cord, musical organization, ligature, sequence, etc.; to fetter; to help make fast; as, to bind grain in bundles; to bind a prisoner.
  • To limit, restrain, or hold by actual force or impact of any kind; as, destination binds the planets to your sunshine; frost binds the earth, or perhaps the streams.
  • To cover, just like a bandage; to bandage or dress; -- occasionally with up; as, to bind up a wound.
  • to produce quickly ( something) about or upon something, because by tying; to encircle with something; as, to bind a buckle about one; to bind a compress upon a part.
  • To prevent or restrain from customary or normal activity; as, certain medications bind the bowels.
  • To protect or improve by a band or binding, as the edge of a carpeting or garment.
  • To sew or fasten together, and inclose in a cover; as, to bind a book.
  • Fig.: To oblige, restrain, or hold, by expert, legislation, duty, guarantee, promise, affection, or other ethical tie; because, to bind the conscience; to bind by kindness; limited by love; trade binds nations to one another.
  • To bring (any one) under definite appropriate responsibilities; esp. beneath the obligation of a relationship or covenant.
  • To place under appropriate responsibility to offer; to indenture; because, to bind an apprentice; -- often without; because, bound out to solution.
  • To connect; to limit by any ligature.
  • To contract; to cultivate tough or rigid; to cohere or stick collectively in a size; since, clay binds by temperature.
  • become restrained from motion, or from customary or normal activity, as by friction.
  • To use a binding or restraining influence.
  • That which binds or ties.
  • Any twining or climbing plant or stem, esp. a hop vine; a bine.
  • Indurated clay, when much mixed with the oxide of iron.
  • A ligature or connect for grouping records.

bind meaning in Law Dictionary

To obligate; to create or put under definite duties or legal obligations, particularly by a bond or covenant; to affect one out of a constraining or compulsory fashion with a contract or a judgment. So long as a contract, an adjudication, or a legal connection remains in force and virtue, and continues to impose duties or obligations, it is known to be "binding." A guy Is limited by his contract or promise, by a judgment or decree against him, by their relationship or covenant, by an estoppel, etc. Stone v. Bradbury, 14 me personally. 193; Holmes v. Tutton, 5 El. & Bl. therefore; Bank v. Ireland, 127 N. C. 238, 37 S. E. 223; Douglas v. Ilennessy, 15 It I. 272, 10 Atl. 583.


bind meaning in Etymology Dictionary

Old English bindan "to tie up with bonds" (actually and figuratively), also "to help make captive; to pay for with dressings and bandages" (course III strong verb; past tense musical organization, past participle bunden), from Proto-Germanic *bindan (cognates: Old Saxon bindan, Old Norse and Old Frisian binda, Old High German binten "to bind," German binden, Gothic bindan), from PIE root *bhendh- "to bind" (identify flex). Intransitive sense of "stick collectively" is from 1670s. Of books, from c.1400.

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  • "anything that binds," in various sensory faculties, late Old English, from bind (v.). Indicating "tight or embarrassing situation" is from 1851.

bind meaning in Cooking Dictionary

To thicken or smooth the persistence of a liquid.

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  • To blend in ingredients such as for instance eggs, flour, butter, or lotion to thicken a sauce or hot fluid.

bind meaning in Sports Dictionary

an easy method of removing an attacking knife by making a half-circular movement aided by the tip of this sword whenever blades are actually in touch. (sport: contemporary Pentathlon - Fencing)

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  • an easy method of removing an attacking blade by simply making a half circular activity using the tip associated with the blade if the blades are already in touch. (recreation: Fencing)

bind meaning in Business Dictionary

1. Act of combining, attaching or acquiring several objects together without switching the built-in nature of every specific object. As an example, people writing a study composed of many pages can bind all those pages with a staple. 2. Colloquial term to be in a state of possible trouble or anxiety. Including, an organization that bad cash flows and plenty of debts can probably be said to be in a bind. 3. To make permanent or irrevocable when it comes to documents or contracts. As an example, men and women in the usa can bind on their own to home financing with a fixed rate of interest when they consent to a lending establishment's conditions and terms. 4. Constraining or constricting to a defined pair of principles, limits or variables. Like, some businesses have firewalls that bind computer systems to regional intranets.


bind meaning in General Dictionary

(v. t.) To tie, or confine with a cord, band, ligature, string, etc.; to fetter; to make quickly; as, to bind grain in bundles; to bind a prisoner.

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  • (v. t.) To confine, restrain, or hold by actual force or impact of any kind; because, destination binds the planets to your sun; frost binds our planet, or even the streams.
  • (v. t.) To cover, just like a bandage; to bandage or outfit; -- occasionally with up; since, to bind up a wound.
  • (v. t.) To help make fast ( a thing) about or upon some thing, as by tying; to encircle with some thing; as, to bind a belt about one; to bind a compress upon a component.
  • (v. t.) To avoid or restrain from customary or normal action; because, particular medicines bind the bowels.
  • (v. t.) To protect or improve by a band or binding, as the side of a carpet or garment.
  • (v. t.) To sew or fasten collectively, and inclose in a cover; as, to bind a novel.
  • (v. t.) Fig.: To oblige, restrain, or hold, by authority, law, responsibility, promise, promise, affection, or any other ethical wrap; because, to bind the conscience; to bind by kindness; limited by love; commerce binds countries together.
  • (v. t.) To carry (anybody) under definite appropriate responsibilities; esp. under the responsibility of a bond or covenant.
  • (v. t.) To put under legal responsibility to provide; to indenture; since, to bind an apprentice; -- sometimes without having; as, bound out to service.
  • (v. i.) To link; to limit by any ligature.
  • (v. i.) To contract; to cultivate tough or rigid; to cohere or stick together in a mass; since, clay binds by heat.
  • (v. i.) becoming restrained from movement, or from customary or normal activity, as by friction.
  • (v. i.) To use a binding or restraining impact.
  • (letter.) Whatever binds or ties.
  • (n.) Any twining or climbing plant or stem, esp. a hop vine; a bine.
  • (letter.) Indurated clay, when much combined with the oxide of iron.
  • (letter.) A ligature or connect for grouping notes.

Sentence Examples with the word bind

The very form of the bull, which merely sums up the various items of information that had reached the pope, is enough to prove that the decree was not intended to bind anyone to belief in such things.

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