meaning of balk

balk meaning in General Dictionary

to point to fishermen by shouts or indicators from coast the course taken because of the shoals of herring

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  • to take part in contradiction to stay in opposition
  • A ridge of land left unplowed between furrows or after a field a piece missed because of the plow falling apart
  • refuse to comply
  • the region on a billiard dining table behind the balkline
  • an illegal pitching motion while athletes take base
  • one of several synchronous sloping beams that help a roof
  • one thing immaterial that disrupts or delays activity or development
  • A ridge of land left unplowed between furrows, or at end of an area; a piece missed by the plow sliding aside.
  • a good beam, rafter, or timber; esp., the tie-beam of a household. The loft overhead ended up being called "the balks."
  • among the beams connecting the consecutive supports of a trestle bridge or bateau bridge.
  • A hindrance or dissatisfaction; a check.
  • an abrupt and obstinate end; a deep failing.
  • A deceptive gesture of pitcher, as if to produce the baseball.
  • To leave or make balks in.
  • To leave heaped up; to heap up in piles.
  • To omit, miss, or forget by opportunity.
  • To miss deliberately; in order to prevent; to shun; to decline; to release by; to shirk.
  • To disappoint; to irritate; to foil; to baffle; to /hwart; because, to balk expectation.
  • to take part in contradiction; to stay opposition.
  • To stop suddenly and sit however obstinately; to jib; to end brief; to swerve; because, the horse balks.
  • to point to fishermen, by shouts or signals from shore, the path taken by the shoals of herring.

balk meaning in Etymology Dictionary

Old English balca "ridge, bank," from or affected by Old Norse balkr "ridge of land," particularly between two plowed furrows, both from Proto-Germanic *balkon- (cognates: Old Saxon balko, Danish bjelke, Old Frisian balka, Old tall German balcho, German Balken "beam, rafter"), from PIE *bhelg- "beam, plank" (cognates: Latin fulcire "to prop up, assistance," fulcrum "bedpost;" Lithuanian balziena "cross-bar;" and possibly Greek phalanx "trunk, log, line of battle"). Modern senses are figurative, representing the balk as a hindrance or obstruction (see balk (v.)). Baseball feeling is first attested 1845.

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  • belated 14c., "to go out of an unplowed ridge when plowing," from balk (n.). Extended meaning "to omit, intentionally neglect" is mid-15c. Most modern senses tend to be figurative, through the idea of a balk in the areas as a hindrance or obstruction: feeling of "stop quick" (since a horse met with an obstacle) is late 15c.; that "to refuse" is 1580s. Related: Balked; balking.

balk meaning in Sports Dictionary

An illegal maneuver by the pitcher when there is a runner or athletes in the base. The runners automatically check out the following base when a balk is known as. (sport: Baseball)

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  • whenever a skier will not just take a jump in a contest. (sport: waterskiing)

balk meaning in Veterinary Dictionary

a phrase always indicate what goes on when an animal prevents action suddenly.


balk meaning in General Dictionary

(v. i.) A ridge of land left unplowed between furrows, or at the end of a field; a bit missed by the plow falling apart.

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  • (v. i.) An excellent ray, rafter, or wood; esp., the tie-beam of a property. The loft above ended up being called "the balks."
  • (v. i.) One of many beams connecting the successive aids of a trestle bridge or bateau bridge.
  • (v. i.) A hindrance or dissatisfaction; a check.
  • (v. i.) An abrupt and obstinate end; failing.
  • (v. i.) A deceptive motion of pitcher, as though to provide the ball.
  • (v. t.) To leave or make balks in.
  • (v. t.) To go out of heaped up; to heap up in piles.
  • (v. t.) To omit, miss, or forget by opportunity.
  • (v. t.) To miss intentionally; in order to prevent; to shun; to decline; to let go by; to shirk.
  • (v. t.) To let you down; to frustrate; to foil; to baffle; to /hwart; as, to balk expectation.
  • (v. i.) To engage in contradiction; to stay in resistance.
  • (v. i.) to cease abruptly and sit nonetheless obstinately; to jib; to cease brief; to swerve; since, the horse balks.
  • (v. i.) to point to fishermen, by shouts or signals from shore, the course taken by the shoals of herring.

Sentence Examples with the word balk

At the very moment when she would have seized her prey, the hare moved and darted along the balk between the winter rye and the stubble.

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