meaning of bail

bail meaning in General Dictionary

A line of palisades serving as an exterior defense

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  • The arched handle of a kettle pail or similar vessel frequently movable
  • Custody maintaining
  • to provide to produce
  • To lade to dip and toss generally without having on bail water out of a boat
  • a bucket or information found in bailing water out of a motorboat
  • release after a security is paid
  • protected the production of (somebody) by providing security
  • provide anything in trust to a person for a unique function as well as a small duration
  • eliminate (liquid) from a vessel with a container
  • bare (a vessel) by bailing
  • (criminal law) money that must definitely be forfeited by the bondsman if an accused individual doesn't come in court for test
  • the legal system enabling an accused individual be temporarily introduced from custody (usually on condition that a sum of cash ensures their appearance at test)
  • A bucket or scoop utilized in bailing liquid from a boat.
  • To lade; to dip and put; -- typically devoid of; as, to bail liquid out-of a boat.
  • To drop or lade liquid from; -- usually without expressing completeness; since, to bail a boat.
  • to provide; to release.
  • setting no-cost, or deliver from arrest, or regarding custody, on the task of some other person or persons which he or they'll be in charge of the appearance, at a particular time and put, of individual bailed.
  • to provide, as products in trust, for some unique object or purpose, upon a contract, expressed or implied, that trust will be faithfully executed for the bailee, or individual intrusted; since, to bail cloth to a tailor to-be made into a garment; to bail goods to a company.
  • Custody; maintaining.
  • the individual or persons which procure the release of a prisoner through the custody regarding the officer, or from imprisonment, by becoming definitely for their look in court.
  • The safety offered the appearance of a prisoner if you wish to acquire his launch from custody associated with officer; as, the guy is out on bail; going bail for any one.
  • The curved handle of a kettle, pail, or similar vessel, frequently movable.
  • A half hoop for supporting the address of a carrier's wagon, awning of a watercraft, etc.
  • A line of palisades serving as an exterior security.
  • The outer wall surface of a feudal palace. Therefore: The Area inclosed because of it; the exterior judge.
  • A certain restriction within a forest.
  • A division when it comes to stalls of an open stable.
  • The top or cross piece ( or either of the two cross pieces) for the wicket.

bail meaning in Legal Dictionary

1) n. the amount of money or relationship post to secure the production of a person who is faced with a crime. For minor crimes bail is normally set by a schedule which will show extent to be paid before any court look (arraignment). For lots more serious crimes the total amount of bail is scheduled because of the judge within suspect's very first court look. The idea usually bail guarantees the look of the defendant in courtroom whenever needed. Although the Constitution ensures the right to reasonable bail, a court may deny bail in instances billing murder or treason, or when there is a danger that defendant will flee or devote mayhem. In some traffic matters the defendant may forfeit the bail by non-appearance since the bail is the same as the good. 2) v. to create cash or relationship to secure an accused defendant's release. That is typically known as "bailing away" a prisoner.


bail meaning in Law Dictionary

Releasing a prisoner because of a deposit of a security. Anyone must still appear in court. A civil case allows release but unlawful problems depend on the process of law discernment. Bail can also be rejected.


bail meaning in Etymology Dictionary

"bond cash," late 15c., an awareness that evidently developed from that "temporary release from prison" (to the custody of some other, whom provides safety), taped from early 15c. That developed from earlier in the day meaning "captivity, custody" (early 14c.). From Old French baillier "to manage, to guard, deliver" (12c.), from Latin bajulare "to keep an encumbrance," from bajulus "porter," that is of unidentified source. In late 18c. unlawful slang, to give leg bail meant "to hightail it."

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  • "to procure another person's launch from prison" (by publishing bail), 1580s, from bail (n.1); generally without. Relevant: Bailed; bailing.
  • "to dip water out of," 1610s, from baile (n.) "small wood container" (mid-14c.), from nautical Old French baille "bucket, pail," from Medieval Latin *bajula (aquae), literally "porter of water," from Latin bajulare "to bear an encumbrance" (see bail (n.1)). To bail out "leave out of the blue" (intransitive) is recorded from 1930, originally of airplane pilots. Related: Bailed; bailing.
  • "horizontal little bit of wood in a cricket wicket," c.1742, initially "any cross-bar" (1570s), most likely identical with center French bail "horizontal piece of wood attached on two stakes," and with English bail "palisade wall, exterior wall of a castle" (see bailey).

bail meaning in Business Dictionary

Release of an arrested or imprisoned accused when a specified quantity of protection is deposited or pledged (as money or property) to guarantee the accused's look in judge whenever ordered. In civil instances, an accused has a right to be circulated on bail ahead of the test. In criminal instances, bail is allowed only on discretion of court. The courtroom will reject bail in case it is happy you can find significant reasons for believing that the accused, if released, would abscond, devote an offence, or affect evidence or witnesses.


bail - French to English

local rental contract


bail meaning in General Dictionary

(n.) A bucket or information utilized in bailing water from a boat.

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  • (v. t.) To lade; to dip and throw; -- usually without having; since, to bail liquid out-of a boat.
  • (v. t.) To drop or lade water from; -- usually with out to state completeness; because, to bail a boat.
  • (v./t.) To produce; to release.
  • (v./t.) To create no-cost, or provide from arrest, or out of custody, in the task of someone else or individuals he or they'll certainly be responsible for the look, at a certain day and put, of the individual bailed.
  • (v./t.) To produce, as goods in trust, for many unique object or function, upon a contract, expressed or suggested, that the trust will probably be faithfully performed on the part of the bailee, or person intrusted; as, to bail fabric to a tailor to be made into a garment; to bail goods to a carrier.
  • (n.) Custody; maintaining.
  • (n.) The individual or people just who procure the release of a prisoner from custody of this officer, or from imprisonment, by getting undoubtedly for his look in judge.
  • (letter.) The protection provided for appearance of a prisoner to get their launch from custody associated with officer; as, the person is out on bail; going bail for one.
  • (n.) The arched handle of a kettle, pail, or comparable vessel, often movable.
  • (letter.) A half hoop for supporting the address of a carrier's wagon, awning of a boat, etc.
  • (letter.) A line of palisades providing as an exterior security.
  • (n.) The external wall of a feudal castle. Ergo: The space inclosed because of it; the external court.
  • (letter.) A specific limitation within a forest.
  • (letter.) A division the stalls of an open stable.
  • (n.) The utmost effective or cross piece ( or either regarding the two cross pieces) associated with wicket.

Sentence Examples with the word bail

Sec. 16 contains a provision empowering the chief governor and privy council of Ireland by a proclamation under the great seal of Ireland to suspend the act during such time only as there shall be an actual invasion or rebellion in Ireland; and it is enacted that during the currency of the proclamation no judge or justices shall bail or try any person charged with being concerned in the rebellion or invasion without an order from the lord lieutenant or lord deputy and senior of the privy council.

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