meaning of Bubble

Bubble meaning in General Dictionary

to go up in bubbles as fluids whenever boiling or agitated to contain bubbles

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  • A thin film of fluid inflated with environment or gasoline as a soap bubble bubbles at first glance of a river
  • flow in an unusual existing with a bubbling noise
  • boost in bubbles or like in bubbles
  • cause to create bubbles
  • type, produce, or emit bubbles
  • expel gas from the stomach
  • a hollow globule of gas (e.g., environment or carbon dioxide)
  • a dome-shaped covering manufactured from transparent glass or synthetic
  • an impracticable and illusory idea
  • a speculative scheme that is determined by volatile aspects the planner cannot control
  • a thin film of liquid inflated with air or gasoline; because, a soap bubble; bubbles at first glance of a river.
  • a tiny level of air or gas within a liquid body; as, bubbles increasing in champagne or aerated oceans.
  • A globule of air, or globular cleaner, in a transparent solid; as, bubbles in screen cup, or in a lens.
  • a little, hollow, drifting bead or globe, formerly employed for testing the potency of spirits.
  • The globule of air within the spirit pipe of an even.
  • something that wishes tone or solidity; that which is much more specious than real; an untrue show; a cheat or fraud; a delusive scheme; an empty project; a dishonest speculation; since, the Southern water bubble.
  • an individual deceived by an empty project; a gull.
  • To rise in bubbles, as fluids whenever boiling or agitated; to contain bubbles.
  • to perform with a gurgling noise, just as if forming bubbles; since, a bubbling stream.
  • To sing with a gurgling or warbling sound.

Bubble meaning in Economics Dictionary

once the cost of a secured item rises far more than is explained by basics, like the income prone to are based on keeping the asset. The Chicago Tribune of April 13th 1890, writing about the after that mania in real-estate rates, explained "men just who bought home at rates they knew completely well were fictitious, but have been ready to spend these types of costs since they understood that some however higher fool might be depended on to take the property off their particular hands and leave these with a revenue". These types of behavior is an element of all bubbles. Known bubbles feature tulip mania in Holland during the seventeenth century, whenever costs of tulip light bulbs reached uncommon amounts, additionally the Southern water Bubble in Britain a century later on, even though there have now been many more since, including the dotcom bubble in internet organization shares that explosion in 2000. Economists argue about whether bubbles would be the results of irrational group behaviour (perhaps plus exploitation associated with the gullible public by some savvy speculators) or, as an alternative, are the results of rational choices by those that have just restricted information about the fundamental value of a secured asset and therefore for whom it may be rather sensible to assume the market price is sound. Whatever their particular cause, bubbles usually do not final forever and sometimes end maybe not with a pop but with a crash.


Bubble meaning in Finance Dictionary

The occurrence of increasing share rates amid a state of mind of basic euphoria, leading (inevitably, relating to wiser heads) to a 'bursting' and a reversal for the rates therefore the mood.


Bubble meaning in Law Dictionary

n extravagant or unsubstantial project for extensive functions running a business or commerce, typically created on a fictitious or exaggerated prospectus, to ensnare unwary investors. Organizations formed on these types of a basis and for these types of reasons are known as "bubble businesses." The word is chiefly found in England.


Bubble meaning in Etymology Dictionary

early 14c., perhaps from Middle Dutch bobbel (letter.) and/or center Low German bubbeln (v.), all probably of echoic source. Bubble bathtub initially recorded 1949. Of monetary systems originally in Southern Sea Bubble (1590s), on notion of "fragile and insubstantial."

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  • mid-15c., perhaps from bubble (n.) and/or from center Low German bubbeln (v.), probably of echoic origin. Relevant: Bubbled; bubbling.

Bubble meaning in Sports Dictionary

A gondola-style raise. (recreation: Skiing)


Bubble meaning in Business Dictionary

Temporary problem brought on by unjustified conjecture when you look at the cost of a stock or product to an even that bears no reference to its real worth or potential. Bubbles inevitably fail (rush), wiping out of the cost savings of unsophisticated or unsuspecting people.


Bubble meaning in General Dictionary

(n.) A thin film of liquid inflated with air or fuel; since, a soap bubble; bubbles on the surface of a river.

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  • (letter.) A little quantity of air or fuel within a liquid human body; as, bubbles rising in wine or aerated oceans.
  • (letter.) A globule of air, or globular machine, in a transparent solid; as, bubbles in window glass, or in a lens.
  • (n.) A small, hollow, drifting bead or globe, previously utilized for testing the potency of spirits.
  • (n.) The globule of atmosphere when you look at the character tube of an amount.
  • (n.) Anything that wants tone or solidity; that which is much more specious than genuine; a false tv show; a cheat or fraud; a delusive plan; an empty task; a dishonest conjecture; because, the Southern water bubble.
  • (n.) People deceived by an empty task; a gull.
  • (n.) To go up in bubbles, as fluids when boiling or agitated; to contain bubbles.
  • (letter.) To operate with a gurgling noise, as though developing bubbles; because, a bubbling stream.
  • (n.) To sing with a gurgling or warbling noise.

Sentence Examples with the word Bubble

Meanwhile Ahab half smothered in the foam of the whale's insolent tail, and too much of a cripple to swim,--though he could still keep afloat, even in the heart of such a whirlpool as that; helpless Ahab's head was seen, like a tossed bubble which the least chance shock might burst.

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