meaning of Antonomasia

Antonomasia meaning in General Dictionary

the application of some epithet or even the name of some office dignity and/or like as opposed to the appropriate name of the person as when his majesty is employed for a king or whenever instead of Aristotle we say the philosopher or conversely making use of a suitable name rather than an appellative as when a wise man is named a Solomon or an eminent orator a Cicero

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  • the application of some epithet or perhaps the name of some company, dignity, or even the love, rather than the proper title of the person; as when their majesty is employed for a king, or when, in place of Aristotle, we state, the philosopher; or, alternatively, employing a proper name in place of an appellative, as when a wise man is called a Solomon, or an eminent orator a Cicero.

Antonomasia meaning in Medical Dictionary

1. The substitution of a title for a proper name, like in addressing a physician as "physician" or a nurse as "Nurse."2. The replacement of a personal title for a noun to designate a part of friends or course, as in phoning a geneticist a Mendelist (after Gregor Mendel, whom found the maxims of inheritance). Your message antonomasia is Latin, from the Greek antonomazein, to call alternatively: anti-, in place of + onomazein, to name (from onoma, name).


Antonomasia meaning in Etymology Dictionary

utilization of an epithet for a proper title (or the other way around; like in their Holiness for name of a pope), 1580s, from Latin, from Greek antonomasia, from antonomazein "to name alternatively, call by an innovative new title," from anti "instead" (see anti-) + onomazein "to-name," from onoma "name" (see name (letter.)).


Antonomasia meaning in General Dictionary

(n.) Employing some epithet or perhaps the title of some office, self-esteem, or even the like, instead of the proper name of the individual; as when his majesty can be used for a king, or when, as opposed to Aristotle, we say, the philosopher; or, conversely, the usage an effective title rather than an appellative, as whenever a wise man is called a Solomon, or an eminent orator a Cicero.